History

Professors

Thomas J. Little, Chair

Matthew Shannon

Jack Wells

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

HIST 105 : The World to 1500

Survey of the emergence and spread of major world civilizations from prehistory to 1500. Equal weight given to the civilizations of Africa, Eurasia, and the Americas. This course satisfies the Modes of Inquiry requirement for Understanding the Individual and Society. This course satisfies the proficiency requirement for Written Communication in the disciplines.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 110 : Modern World History

Survey of some of the major trends, events, and forces of change since 1500 with particular emphasis on exploration, revolution, imperialism, industrialization, and their consequences. This course satisfies the Modes of Inquiry requirement for Understanding the Individual and Society.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 111 : American Hist to 1861

Evolution of the American constitutional republic and its ideas, institutions, and practices from the colonial period to the Civil War; the American Revolution, historical challenges of the American political system; religious traditions; immigration; the difference between a democracy and a republic; the tensions between liberty and equality, liberty and order, region and nation, individualism and the common welfare, and between cultural diversity and national unity. This course satisfies the Modes of Inquiry requirement for Understanding the Individual and Society. This course satisfies the proficiency requirement for Oral Communication in the disciplines.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 112 : American Hist Since 1861

Evolution of the American constitutional republic and its ideas, institutions, and practices from the Civil War to the present; historical challenges of the American political system; religious traditions; immigration; cultural diversity; social, political, and economic transformations in American life during the twentieth century; social consequences of the Industrial Revolution and its impact on politics and culture; origi s, effects, aftermath, and significance of the two world wars, the Korea and Vietnam conflicts, and the post-Cold War era. This course satisfies the Modes of Inquiry requirement for Understanding the Individual and Society.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 122 : Modern Europe

History of early modern and modern Europe from the emergence of the Renaissance to the present. This course satisfies the proficiency requirement for Written Communication in the disciplines. This course satisfies the Modes of Inquiry requirement for Understanding the Individual and Society.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 123 : America and the World

Rise of America from a colonial marchland to a global superpower in the twentieth century with emphasis on such themes as war and diplomacy, the transnational and cultural dimensions of American expansion, and America's growing interaction and connections with the wider world.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 205 : Historical Methods

Research methods employed by historians, including a review of information technology, use of libraries and archives, and the process of writing a research paper. This course satisfies the proficiency requirement for Critical Thinking in the disciplines.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 210 : Archaeology & Prehistory

introduction to the methods of archaeological research; history of the archaeological discipline, including the origins of professional archaeology, significant theoretical developments in the field, and current issues in archaeological practice. Ways in which archaeology informs historical research and reveals the social and cultural development of prehistoric peoples on the European and North American continents. This course satisfies the Modes of Inquiry requirement for Interpreting Texts.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 220 : Economic History (US)

Study of American political economy, emphasizing forces that have determined economic growth and development since 1607; social, political, and economic transformations in American life from 1607 to the present; structure and function of the U.S. market economy as compared with other economies. This course satisfies the proficiency requirement for Quantitative Literacy in the disciplines.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 232 : Myth Magic Ritual-Ancient Wld

Religious history of the ancient Mediterranean, focusing on myth and its modern interpretations, magic as a category of activity separate from religion, and the role of ritual in the religious lives of Greeks and Romans. This course satisfies the Modes of Inquiry requirement for Interpreting Texts.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 251 : Perspectives in History

Selected case studies employing specific historical approaches or methods chosen by the instructor in response to students.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 260 : The 1960S

This course offers a critical examination of the "long 1960s," or the political, cultural, social, and economic transformations that swept through the United States and the world from the mid-1970s. Topics include liberalism and conservatism in U.S. politics, the counterculture and student movements, the relationship between the Cold War and decolonization, and activism for civil rights, women's rights, gay rights, and environmentalism. Lectures and discussions explore how the 1960s marked a threshold between the mid-twenieth century and our current world.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 306 : The Old South

The American South from prehistory to the Civil War, emphasizing the normative character of the experience of the region, its centrality in the formation of American culture, and the overall process of sectional differentiation.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 307 : Civil War & Reconstruction

Origins and consequences of the American Civil War. Emphasis on regionalism, sectionalism, and nationalism; economic interdependencies and conflicts; abolitionist saints and pro-slavery divines, and other cultural counterpoints; modern war and ancient traditions; battlefield tactics and broader social strategies; compromise and the deferred commitments to equality and social justice during the post-bellum Reconstruction period.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 310X : History of Christianity

History, liturgy, and doctrine of the church from approximately 100 C.E. to the present. Includes Augustine, Francis of Assisi, Luther, Calvin, Isabella of Spain, Wesley, and John XXIII.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 316 : Hist & Geog of VA & TN

Comparative study of geography and history of two southern states. Emphasis on teacher responsibilities in the public schools with regard to the standards of learning. This course satisfies the proficiency requirement for Written Communication in the disciplines.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 318 : Appalachia

Analytical study of the geography and cultures of the region, as well as the social, economic, and political institutions of the people who live in Appalachia.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 319 : Colonial & Revolutionary Ameri

Events and ideas involved in the long colonial era, especially in Virginia, and seminal intellectual and cultural conceptions of the American Revolution.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 320 : Middle Period America

Events and ideas involved in the critical formative period of nation-building in the early and middle of the nineteenth century, with special emphasis on cultural patterns in religion and ideology, economic aspects of developing trade, commerce and slavery, and emerging regional tensions between North and South.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 321 : Ancient Greece

The history of Greece from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic Period. Topics include the literature and culture of Greece, the rise of the polis and the development of the Classical world, and the transformation of the Greek world in the wake of Alexander's conquests.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 322 : Ancient Rome

The history of Rome from the founding of the city to the fifth century C.E. Topics include the origins of the city as described in myth and archaeology; the development of the republican constitution, Roman imperialism; the creation of the empire by Augustus Caesar; society, culture, and the economy of the Roman world; the religious life of the empire and the historical development of Christianity; and the transformation of the empire during the period of late antiquity.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 324 : Medieval Europe

Analysis of the historical development of culture and society from the sixth century C.E. to 1500; medieval society, institutions, and civilizations; manorialism and feudalism and the evolution of representative government.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 335 : History of Race in the U.S.

Examination of patterns of racial diversity in the U.S. from colonial times to the present. Emphasis on the peculiar institution of slavery, the Jim Crow system of racial segregation, the Civil Rights movement, the relationship between European Americans and Native Americans, and the diverse experiences of immigrant communities.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 340 : History of England

Interpretive analysis of key questions and issues of English history from the Norman Conquest to the present. Topics include the process of nation-building on the island of Great Britain, the development of parliamentary democracy, and the role of England in colonization, imperialism, and industrialization.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 352X : Jesus

Exploration of historical, literary, and artistic portrayals of Jesus through the centuries.

Semester Hours

3

Prerequisites

132 or permission of instructor.

HIST 356X : Women and Christianity

The lives, writings, and influences of women on Christianity. Attention to the history of thought and the changes in culture and value systems. This course satisfies the Modes of Inquiry requirement for Understanding the Individual and Society.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 364 : World Wars

This is a global history of the first half of the twentieth century with a focus on the First and Second World Wars. It links the military history of those conflicts with the impact of war on societies in the Americas, Europe, the Mediterranean, and Asia. The course examines related subjects such as modernity, nationalism, industrialization, race, empire, revolution, strategy, and the broader cultural currents of the age. Lectures and discussions offer an integrated approach to the study of force and diplomacy, war and society, and thelocal and global during the era of the World Wars.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 450 : Seminar

Advanced independent seminar research and writing in a specific area of history under the supervision of a faculty member.

Semester Hours

3

Prerequisites

junior or senior status and departmental permission.

HIST 460 : Independent Study

Advanced directed research in a specific area of history, under the supervision of a faculty member. One to three semester hours.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 470 : Internship I

Work experience related to the student's major, jointly supervised by the department and a professional in the field. Although the usual internship will carry either three or six hours credit, a student may elect to arrange an internship carrying between two and six hours credit with the permission of the department. Each hour of credit will require forty hours at the internship site.

Semester Hours

6

Prerequisites

2.

HIST 471 : Internship II

Work experience related to the student's major, jointly supervised by the department and a professional in the field. Although the usual internship will carry either three or six hours credit, a student may elect to arrange an internship carrying between two and six hours credit with the permission of the department. Each hour of credit will require forty hours at the internship site.

Semester Hours

6

Prerequisites

2.

HIST 490 : Honors Project

Independent research in a special topic for honors.

Semester Hours

3

Prerequisites

senior status, GPA of 3.

HIST 491 : Honors Project

Independent research in a special topic for honors.

Semester Hours

3

Prerequisites

senior status, GPA of 3.

HIST 502 : Colonial & Revolutionary Ameri

Events and ideas involved in the long colonial era, especially in Virginia, and the seminal intellectual and cultural conceptions of the American Revolution.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 503 : Middle Period America

Events and ideas involved in the critical formative period of nation-building in the early and middle nineteenth century, with special emphasis on cultural patterns in religion and ideology, economic aspects of developing trade, commerce and slavery, and emerging regional tensions between North and South.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 505 : Historiography and Methods

Appraisal of major themes in historical writing and major approaches to historical problems, emphasizing a comparative approach to selected historical traditions.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 507 : Civil War & Reconstruction

Origins and consequences of the American Civil War. Emphasis on regionalism, sectionalism, and nationalism; economic interdependencies and conflicts; abolitionist saints and pro-slavery divines, and other cultural counterpoints; modern war and ancient traditions; battlefield tactics and broader social strategies; compromise and the deferred commitments to equality and social justice during the post-bellum Reconstruction period.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 516 : History & Geography of Virginia & Tenn

Comparative study of geography and history of two southern states. Emphasis on graduate- level research and teacher responsibilities in the public schools with regard to the standards of learning.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 517 : Modern American Studies

An American Studies approach to cultural development and ideological growth in modern American society, with special emphasis on regional patterns.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 519 : Pragmatism/Modern American

Philosophical and intellectual currents in the U. S. states since 1911, with special emphasis on pragmatic ideas and reformism in late liberal rationalism.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 520 : Indust & Economic Development

Industrialization and rise of managerial bourgeoisie, petite bourgeoisie, proletariat, and laboring class from the early post-bellum era to the present; organizational capitalism and imperialism, radical protests, the "take-off" phase of industrial development and high mass consumption in the post-industrial era.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 536 : World Wars

The two World Wars in imperialist context and with cross-cultural perspective. Economic causes and consequences, and ideological currents. Battlefield tactics and broader social strategies.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 539 : Europe in Postwar Era

Close examination of the history of Eastern and Western Europe from the end of World War II to the present. Focus on the political and economic reconstruction of early postwar Europe, the role of Europe in the Cold War, the emergence of the "New Europe" in the post-communist period, and the transformation of Europe's political, economic, and cultural relations with the United States.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 540 : History of England

Interpretive analysis of key questions and issues of English history from the Norman Conquest to the present. Topics include the process of nation-building on the island of Great Britain, the development of parliamentary democracy, and the role of England in colonization, imperialism, and industrialization.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 550 : ST in American History

Selected topics in history chosen by instructor in response to students. May be re-taken for credit for different topics.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 552 : Latin America

Comparative analysis of structural continuities and revolutions in Latin American history since the pre-Columbian era.

Semester Hours

3

HIST 600 : Seminar

Capstone course involving original research and investigation of important secondary sources, leading to a major research paper concerning developments in American history, with emphasis on educational problems and classroom challenges.

Semester Hours

3