Geography & Earth & Environmental Sciences

Professors

Edward H. Davis, Chair Aaron Barth
Laura Hainsworth

This department serves students interested in careers or graduate education in geography, earth science or environmental studies.

The Geography program provides a broad-based background for students planning a career in public service, teaching or advanced study in geography.
Objectives: to produce geographically informed citizens who understand the world in spatial terms, to support the education of geography teachers, and to graduate majors who can succeed in geography graduate school and apply geographical thinking in a wide range of activities and careers.

The program in Environmental Studies prepares students for employment or graduate study through interdisciplinary education in both scientific and policy-related aspects of the earth’s ecosystems. The capstone course for all students in the major is the senior seminar, in which students from both tracks meet and study current research relevant to key debates on the environment. Each track contains appropriate contextual and support courses; a minor or contextual and support area is not needed for this program.
Objectives: To provide a basis for sound decision-making through knowledge of environmental science and policy; to create respect for the multi-faceted and interdisciplinary nature of environmental problems; to provide an awareness of the global dimensions of environmental issues, and of the links between local and global scales; to develop skills for analysis and communication proper to the field of environmental studies; to furnish students with service experience through internships in environmental organizations; and to forge stronger connections between the college and its region through service on local environmental issues.

Earth science courses are offered at Emory & Henry as an adjunct to and support for teacher licensure and for majors in environmental studies, geography, and land use analysis and planning. A full major is not offered in this area. Students seeking teacher licensure in earth science must complete a major in geography, biology, chemistry, or physics, and 24 semester hours in earth science, including geology, oceanography, astronomy, and meteorology. Approved courses from environmental studies may be used as elective credit in the earth science licensure program.

EARTH SCIENCE LICENSURE

Students planning to teach may obtain licensure for geography and earth science by completing a geography major and 24 semester hours in earth science, including geology, oceanography, astronomy, and meteorology. Approved courses from environmental studies may be used as elective credit in the earth science licensure program. Students pursuing licensure to teach must notify the Neff Center and be assigned an individual advisor from the Education Department

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

EGSC 110 : Introduction to Engineering Science I

Introduction to engineering fundamentals and preparation for success through integration of problem solving and engineering design, ethical decision-making, teamwork, and communicating to diverse audiences. Students will be introduced to the different types of engineering, including aerospace, biomedical, chemical, civil, computer, electrical, environmental, and mechanical engineering. Pre or corequisite: MATH 121 Four credit hours.

Semester Hours

4

ENVS 100 : Introd Environmental Studies

Study of the earth's environmental systems and of the role of humans in those systems. Focus on the major policy and scientific developments and debates, including such topics as nuclear waste disposal, depletion of stratospheric ozone, global climate change, water pollution, and loss of biodiversity.

Semester Hours

3

ENVS 200 : Environmental Monitoring

Study of human effects on the biosphere and the physical and chemical techniques used to monitor environmental quality. Waste disposal, recycling, energy utilization, industrial pollution, pesticide use, water quality, and regulatory instruments such as the Environmental Protection Act. Quantitative monitoring of air, water, and general environmental quality. Analytical methods and use of modern instrumentation, including gas chromatography, mass spectroscopy, high pressure liquid chromatography, and potentiometric methods. This course satisfies the proficiency requirement for Quantitative Literacy in the disciplines.

Semester Hours

4

Prerequisites

Chemistry 111.

ENVS 205X : Environment & Planning

Introduction to contemporary environmental issues and problem solving at various geographic scales. Particular attention given to planning approaches to environmental issues.

Semester Hours

3

ENVS 206 : Organic Food Production

This course covers the basic principles and methods of organic production of crops, including composting, crop rotation, soil fertility, crop planning and seed ordering for organic production. Students will work in the college vegetable garden as part of the course, practicing all aspects of commercial garden management.

Semester Hours

3

ENVS 207 : Advanced Organic Food Production

This course will focus on the implementation of plans developed in ENVS 206 for the organic production of crops, including soil management and preparation, seed starting, seeding and transplanting, irrigation, harvest and post-harvest handling, and seed saving. Students will work in the college vegetable garden and greenhouse as part of the course, in all aspects of farm management.

Semester Hours

3

ENVS 212X : Environmental Geology

Relations between society and the geologic environment. Focus on geologic hazards such as floods, landslides, volcanoes, and earthquakes; geologic resources such as metals, fossil fuels, and water; and environmental challenges such as groundwater contamination. Lab includes required field trips. This course satisfies the Natural Sciences Core requirement.

Semester Hours

4

ENVS 225 : Sustainable Agriculture in Appalachia

Agriculture is the largest single land use on our planet. This course examines both conventional and unsustainable agriculture and their impacts on our environment. We review design and management of plant crops and animal husbandry systems and the sustainability of these procedures for our region and for our planet.

Semester Hours

3

Prerequisites

Environmental Studies 100.

ENVS 285 : Research Experience Envs Study

Research experience through assistance in faculty-led research projects.

Semester Hours

1

Prerequisites

100 and permission of the faculty member directing the project.

ENVS 286 : Res. Exper. in Environ'l Topic

Research experience through assistance in faculty-led research projects.

Semester Hours

1

Prerequisites

100 and permission of the faculty member directing the project.

ENVS 287 : Res. Exper. in Envir'l. Topics

Research experience through assistance in faculty-led research projects.

Semester Hours

1

Prerequisites

100 and permission of the faculty member directing the project.

ENVS 288 : Research Exp. in Envir. Topics

Research experience through assistance in faculty-led research projects.

Semester Hours

1

Prerequisites

100 and permission of the faculty member directing the project.

ENVS 300 : Wildlife Monitoring & Mgmt

Modern techniques used by field researchers for monitoring individuals and populations of various animal groups important in the Appalachian region. Modern issues and approaches to habitat and species management. Emphasis on research methods.

Semester Hours

4

Prerequisites

Environmental Studies 100 and Statistics 161.

ENVS 320X : Hydrology

Study of the movement, distribution, and quality of fresh water throughout the Earth. Focus on the hydrologic cycle, water resources, watershed sustainability, hydrologic modeling, and the influence of climate, geology, and human activity on the hydrosphere. The lab component requires fieldwork.

Semester Hours

4

Prerequisites

111 or 112, and
Mathematics 123.

ENVS 322X : Environmental Policy

Historical development and current assessment of policy for environmental protection. Emphasis on the geographic nature of policies, resulting from the interplay of local, state, and federal governments and non-governmental organizations. This course satisfies the proficiency requirements for Oral Communication and Written Communication in the disciplines.

Semester Hours

3

ENVS 450 : Seminar in Environmental Studies

Advanced study of selected topics in environmental policy and science, including guest lectures and presentations by faculty and students. This course satisfies the proficiency requirements for Oral Communication and Written Communication in the disciplines. Open to senior Environmental Studies majors or by permission of instructors.

Semester Hours

3

ENVS 460 : Independent Study

Independent research under faculty supervision by students either in the policy track or in the science track.

Semester Hours

4

Prerequisites

senior status or permission of instructor; permission of program director.

ENVS 470 : Internship I

field. Although the usual internship will carry either three or six hours credit, a student may elect to arrange an internship carrying between two and six hours credit with the permission of the department. Each hour of credit will require forty hours at the internship site.

Semester Hours

6

Prerequisites

junior or senior status, permission of program director, and completion of coursework appropriate to the field work.

ENVS 471 : Internship II

field. Although the usual internship will carry either three or six hours credit, a student may elect to arrange an internship carrying between two and six hours credit with the permission of the department. Each hour of credit will require forty hours at the internship site.

Semester Hours

6

Prerequisites

junior or senior status, permission of program director, and completion of coursework appropriate to the field work.

ENVS 490 : Honors Thesis I

Independent research in a special topic for honors.

Semester Hours

3

Prerequisites

senior status, GPA of 3.

ESCI 111 : Physical Geology

Study of rocks and minerals, forces and processes that alter the earth's surface, and mechanisms that contribute to the constantly changing earth. Earth materials, plate tectonics, erosion, volcanism, and diastrophism. Lecture, laboratory, and field work hours. This course satisfies the Modes of Inquiry requirement for Understanding the Natural World.

Semester Hours

4

ESCI 112 : Historical Geology

Past events in earth's history as interpreted by record of the rocks. Major geologic periods, continuity of change, and evolutionary progress of life.

Semester Hours

4

Prerequisites

111 or departmental permission.

ESCI 201 : Weather & Climate

Meteorological and climatological principles presented as background to understanding the global geography of climates. Special emphasis on understanding the relationships between climate and vegetation, and climate and human activities.

Semester Hours

3

ESCI 202 : Geomorphology

Examination of landforms in relation to tectonics, climatic environment, and geologic processes. Special emphasis on understanding the development and evolution of the Appalachian Mountains. Required field trips.

Semester Hours

3

ESCI 212 : Environmental Geology

Relations between society and the geologic environment. Focus on geologic hazards such as floods, landslides,volcanoes, and earthquakes; geologic resources such as metals, fossil fuels, and water; and environmental challenges such as groundwater contamination. Lab includes required field trips. This course satisfies the Modes of Inquiry requirement for Understanding the Natural World. This course satisfies the proficiency requirement for Oral Communication in the disciplines.

Semester Hours

4

ESCI 310A : General Oceanography

Part (a): chemical and biological aspects of the ocean environment; emphasis on life in the beach zone; chemical factors important to study of the ocean world.

Semester Hours

2

Prerequisites

permission of instructor.

ESCI 310B : General Oceanography

Part (a): chemical and biological aspects of the ocean environment; emphasis on life in the beach zone; chemical factors important to study of the ocean world.

Semester Hours

2

Prerequisites

permission of instructor.

ESCI 320 : Hydrology

Study of the movement, distribution, and quality of fresh water throughout the Earth. Focus on the hydrologic cycle, water resources, watershed sustainability, hydrologic modeling, and the influence of climate, geology, and human activity on the hydrosphere. The lab component requires fieldwork.

Semester Hours

4

Prerequisites

111 or 112, and Mathematics 123.

ESCI 350 : St: Geog. & Earth Science

Special studies offered according to needs of students. Emphasis on remote sensing, cartography, environmental geology, and other topics for students in geography, land use planning, environmental studies, and archeology.

Semester Hours

3

ESCI 400 : Field Study

A culminating earth science experience in which skills in field geology are developed and geological sites are investigated; travel required. Each section lasts one week and earns one semester hour of credit. Week 1 (part a) devoted to using tools of geology and the construction of a geologic map. Weeks 2-5 (parts b-e) involve close study of sites in Southwest Virginia and other regions. Depending on student needs, field trips in meteorology and astronomy may be substituted for some geology activities.

Semester Hours

1

Prerequisites

111, 112, and permission of instructor.

ESCI 400A : Field Study

A culminating earth science experience in which skills in field geology are developed and geological sites are investigated; travel required. Each section lasts one week and earns one semester hour of credit. Week 1 (part a) devoted to using tools of geology and the construction of a geologic map. Weeks 2-5 (parts b-e) involve close study of sites in Southwest Virginia and other regions. Depending on student needs, field trips in meteorology and astronomy may be substituted for some geology activities.

Semester Hours

1

Prerequisites

111, 112, and permission of instructor.

ESCI 400B : Field Study

A culminating earth science experience in which skills in field geology are developed and geological sites are investigated; travel required. Each section lasts one week and earns one semester hour of credit. Week 1 (part a) devoted to using tools of geology and the construction of a geologic map. Weeks 2-5 (parts b-e) involve close study of sites in Southwest Virginia and other regions. Depending on student needs, field trips in meteorology and astronomy may be substituted for some geology activities.

Semester Hours

1

Prerequisites

111, 112, and permission of instructor.

ESCI 400C : Field Study

A culminating earth science experience in which skills in field geology are developed and geological sites are investigated; travel required. Each section lasts one week and earns one semester hour of credit. Week 1 (part a) devoted to using tools of geology and the construction of a geologic map. Weeks 2-5 (parts b-e) involve close study of sites in Southwest Virginia and other regions. Depending on student needs, field trips in meteorology and astronomy may be substituted for some geology activities.

Semester Hours

1

Prerequisites

111, 112, and permission of instructor.

ESCI 400D : Field Study

A culminating earth science experience in which skills in field geology are developed and geological sites are investigated; travel required. Each section lasts one week and earns one semester hour of credit. Week 1 (part a) devoted to using tools of geology and the construction of a geologic map. Weeks 2-5 (parts b-e) involve close study of sites in Southwest Virginia and other regions. Depending on student needs, field trips in meteorology and astronomy may be substituted for some geology activities.

Semester Hours

1

Prerequisites

111, 112, and permission of instructor.

ESCI 400E : Field Study

A culminating earth science experience in which skills in field geology are developed and geological sites are investigated; travel required. Each section lasts one week and earns one semester hour of credit. Week 1 (part a) devoted to using tools of geology and the construction of a geologic map. Weeks 2-5 (parts b-e) involve close study of sites in Southwest Virginia and other regions. Depending on student needs, field trips in meteorology and astronomy may be substituted for some geology activities.

Semester Hours

1

Prerequisites

111, 112, and permission of instructor.

GEOG 111 : Human Geography

Natural forces influential in shaping cultural patterns that evolved in human history. Relationship of humankind to such elements as climate, terrain, vegetation, and world location. Cultural forces affecting humankind. This course satisfies the Modes of Inquiry requirement for Understanding the Individual and Society.

Semester Hours

3

GEOG 201X : Weather & Climate

Meteorological and climatological principles presented as background to understanding the global geography of climates. Special emphasis on understanding the relationships between climate and vegetation, and climate and human activities.

Semester Hours

3

GEOG 202X : Geomorphology

Examination of landforms in relation to tectonics, climatic environment, and geologic processes. Special emphasis on understanding the development and evolution of the Appalachian Mountains. Required field trips.

Semester Hours

3

GEOG 205 : Environment & Planning

Introduction to contemporary environmental issues and problem solving at various geographic scales. Particular attention given to planning approaches to environmental issues. This course satisfies the proficiency requirement for Ethical Reasoning in the disciplines.

Semester Hours

3

GEOG 245 : Geography of the Middle East

The Middle East as a cultural crossroads; the region's rich diversity of people, life, and landscape; and its dependence on oil production and scarce water supplies. This course satisfies the International Exploration requirement.

Semester Hours

3

GEOG 316X : Hist & Geog of VA & TN

Comparative study of geography and history of two southern states. Emphasis on teacher responsibilities in the public schools with regard to the standards of learning.

Semester Hours

3

GEOG 322 : Environmental Policy

Historical development and current assessment of policy for environmental protection. Emphasis on the geographic nature of policies, resulting from the interplay of local, state, and federal governments and non-governmental organizations. This course satisfies the proficiency requirements for Oral Communication and Written Communication in the disciplines.

Semester Hours

3

Prerequisites

205.

GEOG 331 : Geography of US & Canada

Regional survey of the U.S. and Canada with the human-use region forming the focal point in the study. Examination of climate, soils, vegetation, terrain, economic resources, historical background, present pattern of population, and general character of the economy of each region.

Semester Hours

3

GEOG 340 : Geographic Information Systems

Introduction to geographic information systems with a focus on concepts, data management, and applications in geographic research, planning, business, and environmental studies. Use of ArcGIS software with both raster and vector data structures.

Semester Hours

3

GEOG 350X : Selected Topics in Geography

Special studies offered according to needs of students. Emphasis on remote sensing, cartography, environmental geology, and other topics for students in geography, land use planning, environmental studies, and archeology.

Semester Hours

3

GEOG 370 : Field Study in Geography

Methods and activities in field research, through investigations conducted at off-campus sites. One-half to three semester hours.

Semester Hours

3

GEOG 390 : Adv Geog Information System

Principles of geodatabase design, spatial modeling, and application of these techniques with both vector and raster data structures. A project-based course, using ArcGIS software in a computer laboratory setting.

Semester Hours

3

GEOG 450 : Seminar

Regional studies not included in regular course sequence, such as Russia, China, Africa, or East Europe, or systematic or topical studies such as geographic concepts, research methods, urban studies.

Semester Hours

3

Prerequisites

junior and senior majors in geography; students from closely related fields accepted by special permission.

GEOG 460 : Independent Study

Advanced independent research in a specific area of geography, under the supervision of a faculty member.

Semester Hours

4

Prerequisites

juniors and seniors with departmental permission.

GEOG 470 : Internship I

Work experience related to the student's major, jointly supervised by the department and a professional in the field. Although the usual internship will carry either three or six hours credit, a student may elect to arrange an internship carrying between two and six hours credit with the permission of the department. Each hour of credit will require forty hours at the internship site.

Semester Hours

6

Prerequisites

junior or senior status and departmental permission.

GEOG 471 : Internship II

Work experience related to the student's major, jointly supervised by the department and a professional in the field. Although the usual internship will carry either three or six hours credit, a student may elect to arrange an internship carrying between two and six hours credit with the permission of the department. Each hour of credit will require forty hours at the internship site.

Semester Hours

6

Prerequisites

junior or senior status and departmental permission.